historicaltimes:

2 year-old John F. Kennedy and his brother Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. -Brookline, Massachusetts, circa 1919
historicaltimes:

"Charles Dickens sat for this daguerreotype portrait in Antoine Francois Jean Claudet’s London studio about 1852"
historicaltimes:

Two U.S. Marines share a foxhole with an Okinawa war orphan in April 1945
historicaltimes:

Ulithi Atoll, home to the 3rd Fleet in late 1944. The land in the foreground is one of several depot islands surrounding the anchorage.

nerdismyhobby:

so-many-frequencies:

loweryi:

crowbegottenbatman:

loweryi:

crowbegottenbatman:

the word “sabotage” is p much short for “fucking shit up with a wooden shoe”

what

image

fucking shit up with a wooden shoe

oh my god

well wooden shoe look at that

I’M FUCKING CRYING AT THAT PUN BE MY FRIEND PLEASE 

(Source: arachnidisa, via pocket-alex)

historicaltimes:

A forty-niner panning for gold at the bank of California’s American River. 1850. Photo by LC McClure

The Persistence of Memory (detail) // Salvador Dali
historicaltimes:

Cuban missile crisis: aerial shot of the Soviet missile launch pads on cuba in 1962
historicaltimes:

U.S. A woman hiding illegal bottles of beer under her skirt in special underwear pockets during the American Prohibition
fromourarchives:

May 31, 1923 - J.C. Penney advertisement for hats and suits in the Wausau Daily Record Herald.
simplymagdorable:

Three women sitting on a bench, Paris 1928
oldmoviemagic:

1920s hairstyles

maudelynn:

1920s Mint Green and Ivory Lace on Net Dress from my Collection

maudelynn:

1920s pink, teal and gold lame evening dress 

via http://www.1stdibs.com

antiquatedfashions:

Arrow of Gold by Paul Poiret.

1924-25, France.

Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Poiret was one of the most important figures in 20th century fashion, so I’m obliged to have some of his work in here! Poiret was a pivotal and sometimes controversial figure during the Belle Époque of 1900-1910. He pushed fashion to be recognised as an art form by daring to go beyond what was ‘safe,’ and constantly turned heads with extravagance and opulence. That being said, the paucity that followed WWI did not bode well for his particular style.